We understand that there are a lot of you out there would love some INSIDE INFORMATION about your roof by those in the know.

We get calls everyday from people who just want some honest advice. Not all of them end up needing our professional services, but they all go away happy that we have helped them understand their roofs better.

Through this website (and our individual associated websites), we hope to provide you the best of information from the Roofing Professionals perspective!

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 LATEST NEWS HERE!

Latest news contents
 Date of posting News description
12/06/12Colorbond cost – Sydney west colorbond prices
10/06/12New – Help page for questions on Sydney roofing
10/06/12Beware – Gypsy roofers in Sydney
12/06/09A visitor questions painting and insulation
26/03/09More insider tips on Colorbond roofs
 4/03/09 Box gutters revisited…
 10/02/09 What is the fuss about roof insulation
 23/02/08 What is the fuss about gutters damaging the house
 22/09/06 Are my tiles weighing my roof down
 22/11/06 Why a metal roof for my house
 25/01/07 The problem with flat tiled roofs
 2/09/07 What to do with that nasty box gutter

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News item 10/06/2012

Colorbond cost – Sydney west colorbond prices

‘colorbond pricing’ is a very common search phrase when people Google roofing in Sydney.. and they then find our website.

So, for those who are just shopping around for prices before you jump in and commit…. Go to my colorbond prices page and there is a video that you can watch to get most of the information that you are looking for.

Jack Yuen 

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News item 10/06/2012

New – Help page for questions on Sydney roofing

If you like the information on this website – but may be looking for a bit more that you cannot find here…

Then I have a help page for you.

This page (and blogs etc) will get more fresh content than this section, so it is worth visiting…

Jack Yuen 

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News item 10/06/2012

Beware – Gypsy roofers in Sydney

If some ‘nice looking’ (maybe with an Irish accent) roofers knock on your door offering to fix a fault on your roof, it is probably best if you do your best to make them leave.

These gypsy roofers have featured on the Daily Telegraph and they will take your money and run. They have been operating in the Inner west of Sydney recently and they may be headed to your suburb. It would not be too bad if they did a good job on the roofs that they work on – but as the following roofing blog and attached video shows, the work quality is pretty BAD!!

Jack Yuen 

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12/06/09    A visitor questions painting and insulation

A visitor to this website had a few questions about roof painting and insulation – that you may also find helpful….

… When you submit an enquiry, this is what it looks like from my end….

visitor question1 comp

Gary had a few questions about painting of roofs, and insulation…

So I sent him a reply and here is how he responded…

“Thanks Jack for the detailed reply!

So it looks like in the future we will replace the tiled roof with colour bond.  A friend at work today mentioned they changed their tiled roof to colour bond with significant difference in inside temp as the steel roof doesnt hold the heat like a tiled roof does and the added advantage of the insulation under the colour bond when installed.  And they have yet to add in the ceiling insulation!

In the meantime I will do as you suggest and get the rebeding and repointing done only as this does need fixing.

As a benchmark so that in the future I at least have a rough idea of costs for the colour bond install.  How much would a colour bond install on a low set single storey home on flat land with free access all round?  The floor plan shows 278 m2 and with eves the total roof area would be some more.

Yes, the gold coast probably does have a few sharks both in and out of the water. 

If you have seen the recent Aussie movie “Getting Square” you will recall at the start of the movie it shows a few shots of the gold coast and then the punch line ‘A sunny place for shady people’.

A good comedy. 

Thankyou so much as you have saved us unecessary time, money and heart-ache and gives me more time to save up for the colour bond 🙂

Gary ‘

On Tue, Jun 9, 2009 at 8:58 AM, Jack Yuen <jack.yuen@theroofingprofessionals.com.au> wrote:

“Gary,

Thank you for your enquiry through our website.

It will be a long time before I semi retire – and I am not sure it will be to the Gold Coast!

I have no real experience with heat reflective paints – although I have done a bit of investigation into it. It can be useful in certain circumstances.

Although, for a simple concrete tiled roof, it may not be the most suitable type of paint – because it can cause leaks by blocking the drainage channels.

The best way to combat heat under a tiled roof is to have good insulation on the ceiling – and if you also have sarking under the roof tiles, this will help.

I opinion on the regular painting that roof painters do on concrete tiles is: Only if you want your roof to look good for a short while. It does nothing for the servicability of the roof.

If you want your roof to keep the rain water out – then the best way is to replace any broken tiiles and have the ridge capping rebedded (as required) and repointed with flexible pointing.

Regards,

Jack Yuen”                                                                                             BACK TO CONTENTS

 

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26/03/09

More Insider tips on Colorbond roofs…

Many of you who visit this site seem to be wanting more information about colorbond roofs…

So here goes…

Roofing thicknesses: There are two main thickness grades of metal roofing. The ‘standard’ 0.42 BMT grade and the thicker 0.48 BMT version. BMT is the Base Metal Thickness – which is the thickness of the metal before the zincalume protective layer is applied and the colorbond paint layer added. The thickness of the final product is the TCT (Total Coated Thickness). So do not confuse the two.

The main reason for the thicker 0.48 BMT grade is to allow the roof framers to space the roof battens further apart (especially for factories). The extra thickness permits a larger ‘span’. For most residential applications, the 0.42 BMT version is adequate where the batten spacing is usually closer together.

The Thicker grade does NOT mean a longer life. Both grades will provide the same duration of service – because the zincalume and colorbond paint layers are of identical thickness.

Sometimes, especially on flat roofs with pedestrian traffic, I would choose the thicker grade because it will make the roof stiffer and less susceptable to ‘crimps’ caused by incorrect foot loading.

What is ULTRA Colorbond?: Ultra colorbond is the name given to a special grade of corrosion resistant high strength steel that is coated with zincalume and painted in a limited range of colorbond colours. The special corrosion resistant base metal means that any exposed edges/surfaces (due to cuts and scratches) do not cause premature corrosion failure. This is especially important near the sea where salts from the seaspray can cause rapid corrosion of unprotected steel.

So if your roof is near the sea, ULTRA colorbond is the recommended product. There is a price premium (approximately 60%) over the standard XRW colorbond product.
Zincalume is for Factories:  I get some customers thinking of the option of using zincalume steel instead of Colorbond – thinking that there would be good savings.

I usually do the sums for them. Colorbond is approximately $1.40 per square metre more than zincalume. But over the area of an average 120 square metre roof, it works out to be ONLY $168.00! …And for this small sum, they will get a far superior product – and with a choice of colours too!

Zincalume is really the choice for factories which have roofs measuring many hundreds and thousands of square metres. And the price savings of using the cheaper material can be substantial here.
Cost comparisons: I also get asked about the price difference between a tiled roof and a colorbond roof. My usual answer is that there is very little price difference between a colorbond roof and a terracotta tiled roof.

…But then I am a bit biased because I specialise in metal/colorbond roofs.

Roof tilers will argue that they can put up a tiled roof cheaper than a colorbond roof… and they can be right. But sometimes, it is more than just a price comparison between just the roofs…

A colorbond roof can be curved, installed almost flat, modified to complex shapes… and most important af all – it is light weight. This weight advantage means a lot less strain on the roof framing,walls and foundations – which means less cracking of walls and bowing of roofs. Also, with the usual ‘building blanket’ insulation under the roof sheets (which also ‘sucks up’ less heat), it is a more energy efficient roof.

…That is it for now.
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4/03/09

Box Gutters revisited….

I seem to be getting a lot of interest about box gutters lately.

If you have read the introduction on our home page and also read the news item below about box gutters and you still want more…

In the picture below, the box gutter on a shop awning was rusted and had to be replaced.

A simple job you would think…. but look what had to be done so that the box gutter could be removed. Almost the whole roof! Then the roof has to be put back together again after the new box gutter has been installed

And that is why it is so expensive to replace box gutters.

box gutter removal comp

 The picture below shows how the bottom of the box gutter has rusted out while the sides still look good.

If a colorbond (or even an expensive stainless steel) box gutter was used instead, this box gutter would still be servicable.

rusty box gutter comp

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News item 10/02/2009

What is all the fuss about roof insulation?

the Roof insulation story no longer applies

Jack Yuen 

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HOT!  News flash   item 23/02/2008

What is all the fuss about gutters doing damage to the house (SMH 23/02/08)?…

The Sydney Morning Herald has today published an article http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/gremlin-behind-the-walls/2008/02/22/1203467388838.html

the article goes on to describe the potential problems with new gutters that lets water overflow into the house.

A few simple precautions (my personal preferences) will keep your house safe:

  • use slotted gutters
  • use external brackets instead of internal (hidden) brackets. External brackets keep the back of the gutter away from the fascia and they do not catch leaves and block up the gutters
  • use timber fascias (with option of colorbond fascia cover) instead of steel fascias.
  • get bigger downpipes.
  • ensure adequate falls on the gutters.
  • install a decent leafscreener type of leaf guard.

For more information and tips, just send me an email.

Til next time …

JACK

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News item 22/9/2006

Are my tiles weighing my roof down?

We got a phone call from a home owner who was quite concerned that a ‘roofing sales person’ had paid him a visit and warned him that his roof was in danger of collapsing due to the old roof tiles. Apparently, the 30 year old concrete roof tiles were faded quite badly and the sales pitch was that the roof tiles were soaking up so much moisture that it was overloading the roof trusses!

We investigated this and the roof tile manufacturers state that all their concrete roof tiles are made and tested to Australian standards. The requirement for water absorption is to have a roof tile completely soaked underwater for 24 hours and have its weight increase by no more than 10%. In reality, the actual 24 hour soak test produces about a 5% increase in weight! This additional weight rapidly decreases when the tile is taken out of the water and left to dry in the sun.

So for all those who still worry about all that additional weight, a slight wind will increase the load on your roof by more than 5%!

I hope this little bit of information will save you heaps of worry.

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 News item 22/11/2006

Why a metal roof for my house?

This is a question we get more often these days. Bluescope has done a good job promoting their colorbond steel range of roofing and fencing products. We also get asked if a metal roof is more expensive.

Depending on the situation, we can change a roof over from a tiled roof into a metal roof a similar price or cheaper than retiling with new terracotta tiles. However, the difference is that you get hail protection (metal roofs do not crack when hit by large hailstones like tiled roofs do) and a better insulated roof cavity. A lighter metal roof places less stress on the walls and foundations and may reduce the cracking of walls due to foundation movements. Tiled roofs are also restricted to minimum roof slopes. You cannot have a flat tiled roof. This is why all rear flat skillion roofs are sheeted in metal.

You can break a tile (or several) when you go up there to clean the gutters of to fix your TV aerial – but you have to try very very hard to break a metal roof!

Of course, a tiled roof has its place in our ongoing roof tradition. However, colorbond metal roofs are becoming more popular.

Contact us (see above) if you want to explore more about why you may want a metal roof.

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News item 25/1/2007

The problem with flat tiled roofs?

I visited a house the other day and it had a terracotta tiled roof using ‘swiss’ profile roof tiles. It was quite ‘flat’ at about 18 degrees pitch. It was sarked. But it still leaked into the house! Not a very satisfactory situation. While ‘swiss’ profile roof tiles have other undesired characteristics, most tiled roofs will leak when it is built too ‘flat’. This is because of water flowing backwards on concrete roof tiles or excessive water overloading the drainage channels at the laps of all roof tiles.

The fact is that tiled roofs are not meant to be built at less than 25 degrees slope- especially where there are leaves around. The solution to flat roofs?

If height restraints means that you must have a flat sloped roof, you must consider using a metal (colorbond) roof.

Contact us (see above) if you want to explore more about why you a flat tiled roof can give you continuous problems.

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News item 2/09/2007

What to do with that nasty box gutter?

A box gutter is usually a drainage channel located within a roof of a property that is ‘boxed-in’ by perimeter walls that are higher than the downstream edge of the roof sheeting. This means that if the box gutter leaks or overflows – the water goes inside the property can can cause much damage. Box gutters are usually the result of  some ‘nice’ architectural feature that demands clean wall lines. It is a headache to building owners!

If you already have a box gutter, it usually means that you have been ‘boxed in’. That is, you have very little other options than to live with it!

With this in mind, you can do three things to to minimise the troubles from a box gutter. Firstly, make sure that there is an overflow that will release excess water outside the building during a severe downpour. Secondly, make sure that the box gutter slopes to the outlets. This will prevent ponding and will add years to the life of your box gutter. Lastly, always use a higher grade material for the box gutter than for your roof, because the box gutter will ‘wear’ out at a faster rate than your roof.

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